Natalie’s Aloe Vera

 Originally Posted 8/3/2015 by Natalie Bonilla Aloe has been around for over 2,000 years. It originated in Africa and belongs, surprisingly, to the lily and onion family. Aloe has been used through the ages for a variety of things. Cleopatra massaged fresh aloe gel on her skin every day to preserve her beauty, and Napoleon’s wife used a lotion of milk and aloe gel for her complexion. However, aloe vera isn’t just for beauty purposes. Aloe has  aesthetic, antibacterial, and tissue restorative properties which makes it great for healing burns from a flame, the sun, or radiation along with sores and poison ivy. All you have to do is break off a leaf, slice it down the middle, and apply the gel to your skin. For a burn or sore that needs more than just a little tender love and care, make a simple poultice by placing the cut leaf on the area and wrapping it with gauze. Depending on the severity of the burn, the tissue regenerates with no scar, and normal  pigmentation of the skin returns. Other than clearing acne and being able to treat oily skin and dandruff, aloe is used everyday all over the world. It’s been used to remove the scent of human before stalking prey. Fishermen in the Atlantic carry aloe vera aboard their boats to stop the pain of a sting from a Portuguese Man o’ War, and farmers use it as an all natural pesticide by mixing the aloe juice with water and spraying it over plants. It works because aloe has a bitter taste which wards off bugs, and you can  use it on yourself as bug repellent. But this isn’t all aloe is capable of. There aren’t hundreds of recipes and uses, but we’ll discuss them in more detail later. I hope this made you a little curious about this often underestimated houseplant, and maybe you’ll check in soon for more on aloe and its awesomeness.

Trang’s Nasturtium

Originally Posted 8/7/2015 by Trang Lam Tropaeolum, commonly known as nasturtium is literally translated into Latin as “nose-twister”. Native to South and Central America, you can find it grown on Awbury Arboretum’s Uptown Farms near the Caroline Cope Farm. Nasturtium has bright flowers and rounded peltate leaves that repel water. It was named by a…

Logan’s Bamboo

Originally Posted 8/7/2015 by Logan Green Bamboo is a very strong and interesting plant. It originated in Eastern China about 5,000 years ago. It has been used for years for things such as chop sticks, fences, baskets, pavilions, and ornamental housing estates. Bamboo begins to grow when it’s spores are spread in a grassed area. The spores begin…

Jovan’s Cowpeas

Originally Posted 8/7/2015 by Jovan Lee Cowpeas are better known as black-eyed peas. The scientific name is Vigna  unguiculata. Cowpeas have come to Awbury to be used as a cover crop on the TLC Uptown Farm. The cowpeas as a cover crop help with the soil to make the soil healthy for our money crops….

Kha’Breah’s Butternut Squash

Originally Posted 8/7/2015 by Kha’Breah Rodgers Butternut squash is a type of squash that is mostly known for eating. We refer to it as squash, but in Australia and New Zealand, it’s known as “butternut pumpkin”. This specific squash is a tannish fruit on the outside, but orange on the inside. Butternut squash is a winter squash…

Jamirah’s Lemon Tree

 Originally Posted 8/13/2015 by Jamirah  Gregory The information you will view today is on the lemon tree, (latin name, citrus limon ) and the fruit it produces is lemons. You will receive a brighter insight on lemons and lemon trees. You will also read about where they come from, ways you can use it and other…

Rasheeda’s Strawberries 

Originally Posted 8/13/2015 by Rasheeda Gregory  The name that is most commonly used “strawberries” which we know it as. The scientific name for it is Fragaria × ananassa. Strawberries are known for their bright red color, juicy texture and sweetness. They’re widely appreciated and taste delicious. Strawberries are a worldwide fruit, you can’t go wrong…